Bruce Paton - Specialist physiotherapist 

My day starts at…
5.45am. I read the newspaper and research articles over coffee and a croissant and listen to music and catch up on emails on the train to work.

My job involves…
Many different things! I specialise in the rehabilitation of lower-limb injuries – hips, knees
and ankles – and see everyone from pensioners with arthritis to world-class athletes. I also do research and teach and mentor university students.

On a typical day I...
Might have a clinic with our orthopaedic surgeons in the morning. We order scans, help patients decide if they need an operation, follow them up after their surgery and ensure they are getting the best possible rehab. Some patients, particularly athletes, are too active and you really have to hold them back. Then you get patients who have never done much exercise or been in a gym before and we help them learn to exercise and get stronger.

After lunch, I might have a physio clinic. It’s much better to get patients to exercise here than send them home with a list of exercises and it’s quite amazing seeing how
the body can change. We can take almost anybody and find something that will make them fitter and stronger.

How I become a physio…
I actually wanted to do medicine but places were limited in Australia, where I studied, so I started a science degree. I then switched to physiotherapy and settled in London more than 20 years ago. I’ve completed a PhD, worked at the Olympics and Paralympics and helped set up the Institute of Sport, Exercise & Health – a concrete legacy of the 2012 Games. I’m glad now that I didn’t study medicine but found something that was more right for me.

The best thing about my job is…
I work with my mind, I work with my hands, I work with people and it’s never boring. It’s a fantastic job.

The worst thing is…
That there aren’t enough hours in the day!

After work…
I run six miles home two or three nights a week. I also like hillwalking, skiing, cycling and swimming and do triathlons. And I am learning how to make bread with my eight-year-old daughter, which is great fun.