Chemotherapy 

At UCLH we treat a wide range of cancers and use many different drugs to treat patients with cancer. These include chemotherapy, antibodies and targeted molecules. These treatments are known as systemic anticancer therapy.

The term ‘chemotherapy’ refers to the treatment of cancer with drugs designed to control or destroy the growth of the tumour. Chemotherapy does this by damaging the DNA in a cancer cell to stop it from replicating. Antibody treatments are special proteins that can kill cancers - they do this by directly killing a cancer cell or by affecting how immune cells interact with cancer cells, to allow the patient’s immune system to kill the cancer cell. Targeted molecules are drugs that disrupt specific cellular process within a cancer cell.

All systemic anti cancer therapies are potentially toxic and can create unwanted side effects. These will be explained to you by the team treating you.

At UCLH chemotherapy is administered in a number of different settings:

In all these departments, systemic anti cancer therapy is delivered by a committed team of medical, pharmacy and nursing staff who are highly trained specialists in this area. Detailed quality procedures govern the prescribing, production, dispensing and delivery of the chemotherapy service.

All patients are given specific information about their disease, their treatment, the side effects and what to do if they feel certain side effects. This includes a phone number you can call to speak to skilled professional staff to discuss any clinical issues that arise while you’re receiving chemotherapy. This is available 24 hours a day.

Dr Martin Forster
Consultant

 Contact details

Patient enquiries
Telephone: 020 3447 3893

GP enquiries
Telephone: 020 3447 3893
Fax: 020 3447 3892

 Useful links