Vaginal Birth After Caesarean Section (VBAC) 

Many women who have had one previous caesarean section can safely have a vaginal birth (VBAC) in a subsequent pregnancy, or they can choose to have a caesarean section. A very small number of women may be advised to have another caesarean section depending on the reason for their first caesarean section or if complications develop in the current pregnancy.

At UCLH we aim to give you the right information that will enable you to consider your options and help you make the right choice for your next birth. When in labour women can access the home from home room on labour ward, which includes the use of the birth pool and cordless fetal monitoring.

Most reasons for having a caesarean section are unlikely to recur. 70% to 80% women (7- 8 women out of every 10) who have had one caesarean section before, should be able to achieve a vaginal birth. If you have previously had a vaginal birth as well as a caesarean section, your chance of having a vaginal birth in this pregnancy then goes up to 90% (9 women out of every 10).

It is helpful to talk to a midwife or doctor about why you had your previous caesarean section. You will be offered the opportunity to discuss the choices available to you in the dedicated birth after caesarean clinic during your pregnancy.

For more information, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has a leaflet on birth options after previous caesarean section (PDF, 357kb).


This series of short clips is for pregnant women who have had a caesarean section.

Most women will  have a choice between deciding on  a vaginal birth or an elective caesarean (planned caesarean section). The videos review the risks and benefits of both, and  describe labour and birth options to women who are opting for a VBAC.

The videos were developed at UCLH through focus groups with women who have  had a previous caesarean section. It is designed to be a simple, comprehensive guide for pregnant women, thier partners and health care professionals. It will facilitate decision-making to ensure women make the birth choice that is right for them.

  • Sharon Rosenblatt: A mothers story - vaginal birth after a caesarean section (VBAC)

  • What happens in a caesarean section? (VBAC)

  • Risks and benefits of VBAC and planned caesarean section

  • What to do when you go into labour (VBAC)

  • Using the birth pool in labour (VBAC)

  • Using the the cordless fetal monitor in labour (VBAC)

  • Epidural as an option for pain relief in labour or caesarean (VBAC)

  • What happens if you go over dates (VBAC)