How you can support the proton beam therapy centre 

With a government investment of £250 million, two NHS proton beam therapy (PBT) centres are being built in London and Manchester. To make the centres the best they can be, we want to raise an additional £20 million.

 

  • How you can help

    If you would like to learn more please get in touch with Nick Gilbert, Head of Charitable Giving, UCLH. He can be contacted by telephone on either 02034479360 or 07852221000, or by email: nick.gilbert@uclh.nhs.uk.

     

    A quick, easy way to give through your mobile, with every penny going towards the centre at UCLH.

    Text UCLH19 £10 to 70700 to give £10

  • What is the additional money for?

    The government investment  provides the funding to build and equip the centres to the same standard as conventional radiotherapy centres.
     
    We are raising £10m of extra funding for each centre (UCLH and The Christie) to ensure that they are world-leading, providing the best care possible to our patients.
    People typically need around 10 weeks of PBT.  We wish to ensure this time is as stress-free as possible.  This is especially important because, even though our patients will no longer have to travel abroad, most will still be away from home and from their wider families, communities and support networks.
     
    The additional funding will help:
    • Provide additional enhanced imaging equipment, located within the PBT treatment facilities.  This includes a specialist CT scanner and MRI scanner in each centre.  Having these as close to the PBT treatment rooms as possible will be a real benefit to patients. 
    • Build and equip specialist paediatric anaesthetics suites at the heart of each centre.  For instance, children who need general anaesthetic for treatment, most of whom will be six years old or less, an extra ten minutes’ journey each way to be treated would represent more than 10 hours of extra time under anaesthesia over the course of a treatment.  Having these facilities will minimise the time children need to be anaesthetised and it will also make the experience less stressful, both for the children and their parents.
    PBT is not just for children, although they will make up around a third of the cases referred for this vital treatment.  To ensure all of our patients benefit we will also provide other age-appropriate facilities.  These include spaces for both teenagers and young adults who have different needs to children, and for older patients too.