Welcome to our directory of health and wellbeing resources. They include booklets, websites, phone apps and videos developed by specialist organisa‚Äčtions to help you manage the physical and emotional impact of cancer. 

You can also find information about the support available from the Macmillan Support and Information Service. Our support and information specialists can help you to find the advice and support that's right for you. Email us at uclh.supportandinformation@nhs.net, call our helpline on 020 3447 3816 or drop in to the Macmillan Support and Information Service on the ground floor of the Cancer Centre.

There is a range of support available to help you drink less, or quit smoking or drugs:

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice, information and support to help you to quit alcohol or drugs, or drink less. They can also signpost you to organisations in your area that can help.

More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 

NHS

The NHS has a range of advice and support:

  • Advice and other resources are available on their Live Well website to help you quit alcohol, smoking, and drugs.
  • A range of quit smoking support tools are available including a phone app, daily emails, Facebook community and a helpline.
  • A range of drink less support tools are available including a helpline, a phone app and tips to cut down alcohol.
  • A directory of services that can help with addictions. Search ‘alcohol’, 'drug’ or 'smoking’ and enter your postcode to find service local to you.

 

Other organisations
  • Alcoholics Anonymous is a free self-help group. You can find a list of local groups on their website. You can also get support by email: help@aamail.org or on their free helpline: 0800 917 7650.
  • Drink Aware has advice and support to help you to reduce your drinking.
  • Smart Recovery groups help people decide whether they have a problem, build up their motivation to change, and offer a set of proven tools and techniques to support recovery.
  • Quit is a UK charity which provides support and advice to people who want to quit smoking. You can call their quitline on 0800 00 22 00 to get support from a trained counsellor.
  • British Lung Foundation has advice to help you quit smoking.

Being physically active before, during and after treatment can have many benefits. These include reducing the side effects of treatment, improving your physical and mental wellbeing, and reducing the risk of a new cancer or another health condition.

There is a range of support available to help you to become physically active:

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice, information and support to help you to be more physically active. They can also signpost you to organisations in your area that can help.

More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 

NHS advice and exercise videos

For advice on how much to exercise and the types of exercise to do visit the following pages:

 

Chair-based exercises

British Heart Foundation chair-based exercises

 

Videos with advice about being active

 

Macmillan Cancer Support resources
  • Physical activity and cancer booklet gives advice about being physically active during, and following, cancer treatment. You can download it or order it online to be sent to your home.
  • Move More activity pack includes the 'Physical activity and cancer' booklet, flyers about popular types of physical activity and a DVD of gentle exercises. You can order it online to be sent to your home.

 

Phone app

The NHS recommends some physical activity phone apps which support you to be more active.

 

GP referral

Ask your GP what’s available in your local area, including GP gym referral schemes.

 

Chemo brain is a common term that describes changes in memory, thinking and concentration that can happen as side effect of cancer treatment. People who have chemo brain may have various symptoms such as difficulty focussing or concentrating, forgetting words, and losing things easily.

There is a range of support available if you have chemo brain:

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice to help you to manage the symptoms of chemo brain. More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 

Support groups

Talking to others with similar experiences, and sharing tips, can help you to manage the symptoms of chemo brain. We run a variety of support groups and have more information about these on our support group page.

 

Websites

The following websites have information about what chemo brain is, possible causes and tips to manage it:

 

Video

Lymphoma Action UK’s chemo brain video includes information from a health expert and someone who has had chemo brain about what chemo brain is and tips to manage it.

Cancer treatments may cause you to lose your hair. There is a range of support available if you have hair loss:

Wig and scarf tying advice at UCLH

Wig and scarf tying advice is available to anyone having treatment at UCLH who experiences hair loss as a result of their condition or treatment. More information about what we offer, including how you can be referred, is available on our wig and scarf tying advice page.

 

Organisations
  • Cancer Hair Care provides support and advice to anyone with hair loss caused by cancer treatment.
  • Look Good Feel Better provides practical advice including make-up techniques to anyone who has lost their eyebrows and eyelashes through cancer treatment.
  • My New Hair provides support and advice to anyone with medical hair loss.

 

Websites

The following websites have information about coping with hair loss:

 

Booklet

Macmillan Cancer Support Coping with hair loss booklet has advice to help you to prepare for, and cope with, hair loss.

 

Videos

The following videos include patients' experiences and expert advice on how to cope with hair loss:

Healthy eating has many benefits: it can reduce fatigue, improve physical wellbeing, give you a sense of control, and reduce the risk of new cancers or other health conditions. There is a range of support available to help you to eat more healthily:

 

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer simple healthy eating advice, and provide information booklets and support to enable you to eat healthily. They can also refer you for diet and nutrition advice.

More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 

Diet and nutrition advice

If you have any concerns about diet or nutrition, our team of dietitians can help. Ask your hospital doctor, nurse or a support and information specialist to refer you. The team offer face-to-face and telephone consultations. There’s more information about the service on our diet and nutrition advice page.

 

Websites

 

Macmillan Cancer Support booklets

There are a range of Macmillan Cancer Support booklets with advice about healthy eating, diet and nutrition which you can download or order to be sent to your home:

 

Videos

 

Phone app

The NHS recommends a range of healthy eating phone apps.

It is common for sleep to be affected after a diagnosis of cancer or a blood condition. Reasons for sleep problems include worry at night, changes to medications, treatment side effects or changes to your lifestyle. There is a range of support available to help you to overcome your sleep problems:

 

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice, information and support if you have sleep problems. More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 

Complementary therapies

We offer a range of complementary therapies which can help you to overcome sleep problems, such as relaxation exercises and aromatherapy. Visit our complementary therapies page for more information.

 

Video 

University College London Hospitals Improve your sleep video and handout.

 

Websites

 

Phone app

The NHS recommends a range of phone apps to improve your sleep

Having a diagnosis of cancer or a blood condition can be challenging and it may affect the way you feel. There is a range of support available:

 

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice, information and emotional support to help you manage the emotional impact of cancer or a blood condition. They can also signpost you to other organisations that can help.

More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 
Support groups

Talking to others with similar experiences can help you to manage the emotional impact of cancer or a blood condition. We run a variety of support groups and have more information about these on our support groups page.

 

Helping to Overcome Problems Effectively (HOPE) course

Our six-week HOPE course offers practical advice to help you manage the emotional and physical impact of cancer. It will also give you an opportunity to talk with others who have similar experiences. More information about the HOPE course is available on our wellbeing programme page.

 
Psychological and emotional support

If you are experiencing ongoing issues of anxiety or low mood, or find it difficult to manage your thoughts and feelings, you can speak to one of our psychologists or counsellors. Visit our psychological and emotional care team page for more information including how you can be referred.

 

Complementary therapies

We offer a range of complementary therapies which can help you to manage you emotions. Visit our complementary therapies page for more information.

 

Websites

 

Macmillan Cancer Support booklet

The How are you feeling? booklet gives tips and advice to manage the emotional impact of cancer. You can download it or order it online to be sent to your home.

 

Videos

 

Phone apps

The NHS recommends a range of phone apps to manage mental health.

 

Meditation, mindfulness and relaxation

Mindfulness is the ability to be present, to rest in the here and now, and to be fully engaged with whatever we’re doing in the moment.

Meditation aims to train our attention and awareness to achieve a mentally clear and emotionally calm and stable state.

Relaxation techniques can help to calm and relax your body and mind. They are particularly helpful if you feel stressed or anxious, or have trouble sleeping.

Here are some web links which offer guidance through meditation, mindfulness and relaxation exercises: 

Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common symptoms or side effects people with cancer experience. There is a range of support available to help you to manage your fatigue:

 

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice, information and emotional support to help you to manage your fatigue. More information about what the team offers and how you can contact them is available on the support and information page.

 

Video 

University College London Hospitals Manage your fatigue video and handout.

 

Websites
  • RESTORE an online tool designed by the University of Southampton in collaboration with Macmillan Cancer Support to help you to cope with fatigue.
  • Macmillan Cancer Support website has advice about managing fatigue.

 

Macmillan Cancer Support booklet

The Coping with fatigue booklet gives advice about managing fatigue following cancer treatment. You can download it or order it online to be sent to your home.

 

Phone app

Untire: Beating cancer fatigue phone app is recommended by the NHS. It gives step-by-step advice to help you to overcome fatigue.

If you experience pain related to your cancer or blood condition, your hospital doctor or nurse can help you to find ways to manage it. We have also included some general advice you may find helpful:

 

Complementary therapies

We offer a range of complementary therapies which can help you to manage your cancer pain. Visit our complementary therapies page for more information.

 

Macmillan Cancer Support resources
  • The Managing cancer pain booklet gives tips and advice to manage cancer pain. You can download it or order it online to be sent to your home.
  • Their web page has advice about managing cancer pain.

 

Video

Cancer Wellbeing London Cancer Pain video has advice to help you to manage your cancer pain.

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice, information and support to help you talk to children if you have cancer, including tips on how to prepare what to say. More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 

Website

 

Booklet

 

Videos

You may have questions or concerns about staying in work, or returning to work, after a cancer diagnosis. There is a range of information and advice available to support you:

 

Support and information drop-in at UCLH

Our team of support and information specialists can offer advice, information and emotional support to help you to stay in work or return to work. More information about what the team offers, and how you can contact them, is available on the support and information page.

 

Website

Macmillan Cancer Support Making decisions about work after treatment web page gives advice about staying in work or returning to work. It includes information on what your work rights are, and how to prepare for returning to work or looking for a new job.

 

Macmillan Cancer Support booklets

There are a range of Macmillan Cancer Support booklets with advice about work and cancer. You can download or order them to be sent to your home:

  • Work and Cancer booklet looks at how cancer and its treatment can affect your ability to work. It covers employment rights and coping with the effects of treatment at work, for example fatigue.  

 
Video

Cancer Wellbeing London Cancer and work video has advice to help you stay in work, or return to work, following a cancer diagnosis.

 

Local councils

Visit your local council website to find organisations that can help you to stay in, or return to, employment. These include job centres which can help you to update your CV or support you to find a new job.